Government Ethics

Vermont ranks 43rd in government integrity laws

Most of Vermont’s elected officials are honorable and ethical, but some might fall short.  However, without clear lines of what is and what is not ethical, the mere perception of waste, fraud, abuse or corruption undermines confidence in government and public servants.

Vermont affords its residents the pleasure of knowing their neighbors. Our state is full of small towns where we all know just about everyone. However, we should not mistake seeing elected officials at a meeting or bumping into them at a gas station, grocery store or high school athletic event as transparency or accountability. This is accessibility, not transparency.

Current laws address criminal activity, but not ethics and professional conduct in each branch – and at each level – of state government. That’s why Vermont ranks 43rd in government integrity laws according to the Better Government Association. And, as a practical matter, there is no process to which everyday Vermonters can turn if a government officials’ behavior is ethically questionable. We can do better.

Last legislative session, Campaign for Vermont was successful in pushing the House of Representatives to modify the rules and strengthen the standards for ethical behavior.  Among other changes, lawmakers are now required to disclosed a comprehensive list of who compensates them.  There will also be an independent ethics committee charged with overseeing legislator behavior.  This is a major step forward, but there is more work to be done.

State Employees Deserve Clear Whistleblower Protections
Press Statement (released 1/20/14)
Download (pdf)

Achieving Vermont Ethics Standards and Accountability in State Goverment
Position Paper (released 12/30/2013)
Download (pdf)

How 50 States Handle Ethics - Comparative Chart

Showing 2 reactions

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.

Donate Volunteer

connect

get updates